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Help Page

If you have a question regarding your cat that's not answered below please visit our "Help Page"

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Aggression
Aggression in cats can be a complicated and upsetting problem for owners to solve. An aggressive cat can be very dangerous, especially toward children who may not be able to recognize the physical cues that are the warning signs of aggression. Additionally, cat bites and scratches are painful and can transmit disease. Read more...

Ataxia
There are three clinical types of ataxia: sensory (proprioceptive), vestibular, and cerebellar. All three types produce changes in limb coordination, but vestibular and cerebellar ataxia also produce changes in head and neck movement. Ataxia, in general, is a condition relating to a sensory dysfunction that produces loss of coordination of the limbs, head, and/or trunk. Read more...

Bottle Feeding Kittens
Bottle feeding a kitten requires special nursers (bottle with nipple) designed for hand-feeding kittens. Make sure the kitten is on its stomach, even if it’s in your lap or on your tummy. DO NOT turn the kitten on its back to bottle feed, as this will cause the kitten to aspirate and possibly drown in the formula. Read more...

Bringing Home A New Kitty
Going to a new home is one of the most stressful and frightening experiences in a cat’s or kitten’s life. It’s compared to the stress we would experience if our home burned down, we were forced from our jobs, and our friends and family disappeared – all in the same day. Read more...

Calicivirus
Feline calicivirus infection is a common respiratory disease in cats. The virus attacks the respiratory tract -- lungs and nasal passages -- the mouth, with ulceration of the tongue, the intestines, and the musculoskeletal system. It is highly communicable in unvaccinated cats, and is commonly seen in multicat facilities, shelters, poorly ventilated households, and breeding catteries. Read more...

Cat Breeds
Not sure what breed your cat is? Do you want to know more about the personailty of a specific breed? See our most popular cat breeds and their personalities here.

Cats Body Language
Cats are savvy communicators, using nearly every part of their bodies to “talk.” Being savvy yourself in interpreting their language can help you bond with your cat, alleviate frustrations, and even prevent accidents. Read more...

Cats Diets Are Different
Our wonderful life-supporting planet is home to a remarkably diverse and complex spectrum of living organisms. And although all living things do share some common traits and similar biochemical pathways and cellular functions, there are many notable differences that make each creature stand out from the crowd. So even with the thread of sameness joining all the planets’ life forms, diversity and difference makes us take note of each creature’s uniqueness. Maybe that’s why the cat is America’s favorite house pet ... cats are different! Read more...

Cerebellar Hypoplasia
Feline cerebellar hypoplasia is a non-progressive, non-contagious neurological condition that results in walking and balance problems. Read more...

Cleft Soft Palate
Soft palate disorders are usually congenital defects of the fleshy tissue at the back of the throat that separates the oral and nasal cavities. The most common disorders are a defect or "cleft" in the palate or an elongation of the palate. The soft palate can be traumatized and lacerated, such as following a penetrating stick injury. Read more...

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Declawing
If you are considering declawing your cat, please read this. It will only take a moment, and it will give you valuable information to help you in your decision. Read more...

Destructive Scratching
Cats like to scratch. They scratch during play. They scratch while stretching. They scratch to mark territory or as a threatening signal other cats. And because cats’ claws need regular sharpening, cats scratch on things to remove frayed, worn outer claws and expose new, sharper claws. Unfortunately, all this scratching can cause a lot of damage to furniture, drapes and carpeting! Read more...

Diabetes
Diabetes mellitus-also known as "sugar" diabetes-is a complex but common disease in which a cat's body either doesn't produce or doesn't properly use insulin. Read more...

Diet Tips For Obese Cats
One of the major concerns for all cat owners to watch out for is their cat gaining too much weight. Obesity in pets is becoming more visible and as a good cat owner you want to take care of your cat’s health. This article will provide some tips for obese cats. Read more...

Entropion
Entropion in cats is a condition which causes the eyelids to turn inward, rather than lying flush and round with the eyeball. Although the condition is not common for cats, it does tend to have a higher rate of occurrence in purebred cats. Both the Burmese and the Persian are two particular purebreds that are known to be afflicted by entropion more commonly than any other cat breed. Entropion is not a life-threatening condition, but it can cause moderate amounts of irritation and can affect the ability of a cat to see normally. Read more...

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Feeding Your Cat
Because nutrition is one of the most important keys to your cat's health and longevity, one of your most important responsibilities as a cat owner is to provide your cat with the necessary nutrients required for its growth and maintenance. To do this, it is first necessary to understand what cats need in their diet. Read more...

Feline Herpes Virus (FHV)
Rhinotracheitis is caused by the feline herpes 1 virus. It’s one of the most common diseases of cats in the developed World. Read more...

Feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome (FHS)
Feline Hyperesthesia Syndrome (FHS), also known as “twitch-skin syndrome” and “psychomotor epilepsy,” is an obscure cat disorder resulting in intense biting or licking of the back, tail, and pelvic limbs. Read more...

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)
Virologists classify feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) as a lentivirus (or "slow virus"). FIV is in the same retrovirus family as feline leukemia virus (FeLV), but the viruses differ in many ways including their shape. FIV is elongated, while FeLV is more circular. The two viruses are also quite different genetically, and the proteins that compose them are dissimilar in size and composition. The specific ways in which they cause disease differ, as well. Read more...

Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP)
Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a viral disease of cats caused by certain strains of a virus called the feline coronavirus. Most strains of feline coronavirus are avirulent, which means that they do not cause disease, and are referred to as feline enteric coronavirus. Read more...

Feline Interstitial Cystitis (FIC)
Feline interstitial cystitis, sometimes called feline idiopathic cystitis or FIC, is an inflammation of the bladder that causes symptoms of lower urinary tract disease. However, in the case of interstitial cystitis, a definitive cause for the disease cannot be identified. Read more...

Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV)
Feline leukemia virus (FeLV), a retrovirus, so named because of the way it behaves within infected cells. All retroviruses, including feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), produce an enzyme, reverse transcriptase, which permits them to insert copies of their own genetic material into that of the cells they have infected.Read more...

Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD)
Feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) describes a collection of conditions that can affect the bladder and urethra of cats. This syndrome can have many possible causes, but cats generally exhibit similar, recognizable signs. Read more...

Feral Cats
Feral cats are unowned wild cats, often offspring of abandoned, unfixed domesticated cats. They may form colonies near a source of food. Feral cats will breed and overpopulate very quickly if their numbers are not controlled by spaying and neutering. Read more...

FVRCP Vaccine
Cats are susceptible to many contagious diseases, most of which are caused by viruses. Fortunately, we have vaccines to prevent our feline friends from succumbing to several of the worst ones. Read more...

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Head Tilt
Head tilt is a medical condition that may be indicative of a serious underlying disorder, usually of the vestibular system. If a cat is tilting its head frequently to either side of the body (away from its orientation with the trunk and limbs), this is an indication that the cat feels imbalanced. The cat may even struggle to retain a balanced posture and fall. Read more...

Heart Murmurs
Extra heart vibrations that are produced as a result of a disturbance in the blood flow – enough, in fact, to produce audible noise – are referred to as murmurs. Read more...

House Soiling
One common misconception is that cats soil in inappropriate places for revenge. It is tempting to conclude, "He defecated on the living room carpet to punish me for leaving him for the weekend." But this kind of calculation requires sophisticated cognitive abilities that cats aren't believed to possess. Read more...

Hyperthyroidism
Hyperthyroidism is the most common glandular disorder in cats. It is most frequently caused by an excessive concentration of circulating thyroxine-a thyroid hormone better known as T4-in the bloodstream. Read more...

Hypoallergenic Cats
Want to adopt a cat, but suffer from allergies? Some feline breeds are considered "hypoallergenic," which means they produce fewer allergens than others. Cats do produce pet dander, a common allergen, but the culprit for the estimated 10 percent of the population who are allergic to cats may be a protein, Fel d 1, that is present in cat saliva. Read more...

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
There are many possible causes of vomiting and diarrhea, but inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common cause of gastrointestinal problems in the cat. Although cats of any age can be affected, middle-aged or older cats are more susceptible to IBD. Read more...

Manx Syndrome
Manx cats are a fairly hearty breed, though they're prone to Manx Syndrome, a spinal disorder that can occur as a result of the genetic mutation that causes taillessness. Read more...

Megacolon
Constipation is a common problem in cats and in a severe form called "megacolon," the large intestine actually becomes enlarged and filled with hard fecal material. Read more...

Nail Trimming 101
Does your kitty disappear when the clippers come out? Do you have to wrap her in a towel to give her a manicure? According to our behavior experts, calm, enjoyable nail-trimming sessions are not only possible—that’s how they should always be! Check out the following tips for getting kitty to relax while you trim, turning nail-clipping sessions into enjoyable together time. Read more...

Parasites
Gastrointestinal parasitism is a common problem in cats, with prevalence rates as high as 45 percent. The parasites can be wormlike (e.g., stomach worms, roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms) or one-celled (e.g., Isospora, Giardia, Toxoplasma) organisms. Read more...

Poisonous Plants
Some plants are more toxic than others, so we suggest that you be particularly aware of the dangers associated with these common houseplants. Read more...

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Renal Failure (and Treatment)
Renal (Kidney) failure is the inability of the kidneys to remove waste products from the blood. The buildup of toxic wastes produces the signs and symptoms of uremic poisoning. Kidney failure can come on acutely or occur gradually over weeks or months. Chronic renal failure is a leading cause of death in pet cats. Read more...

Rhinitis
Feline rhinitis symptoms are easy to spot and consist of a few easily seen symptoms. The condition can be treated, so the cat feels more comfortable. Read more...

Rhinotracheitis
Feline rhinotracheitis is an acute upper respiratory virus. Although there are many causes of feline upper respiratory infections, rhinotracheitis is known to be the culprit of roughly 80% of all infections. The virus is very contagious and is known to produce secondary infections, such as chlamydia, feline reovirus and pneumonia. Read more...

Ringworm
Ringworm (dermatophytosis) is a fungal infection that can affect the hair, skin or nails of cats, dogs and humans. It is the most common contagious skin infection in cats. In humans, the infection often causes classic ring-like lesions, but these are seen less commonly in cats (and dogs). Read more...

Senior Cats
Just as people are living longer than they did in the past, cats are living longer too. In fact, the percentage of cats over six years of age has nearly doubled in just over a decade, and there is every reason to expect that the "graying" cat population will continue to grow. Read more...

Synechiae
Synechiae are adhesions between the iris and other structures in the eye. They are the result of inflammation in the iris and are particularly common with anterior uveitis (inflammation of the dark tissues of the eye) and trauma to the eye. Read more...

Toxoplasmosis
Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by a single-celled parasite called Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common parasitic diseases and has been found in nearly all warm-blooded animals, including pets and humans. Read more...

Upper Respiratory Infection (URI)
A cat’s upper respiratory tract-the nose, throat and sinus area-is susceptible to infections caused by a variety of viruses and bacteria. Read more...

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)
If you notice your cat attempting to urinate frequently with little result, if you observe blood in the urine, or if your cat uses areas outside the litter box such as sinks, bathtubs or floors, your cat could be having a urinary tract issue. Veterinary attention is important. The veterinarian will perform urinalysis to diagnose the problem and provide treatment. Read more...

Vaccines
Deciding which vaccines your cat should receive requires that you have a complete understanding of the benefits and risks of the procedure. For this reason, it is extremely important that you discuss vaccination with your veterinarian so he or she can help you decide which vaccines are most appropriate. Read more...

Vomiting
Vomiting is a very common problem in dogs and cats. There are many causes of vomiting. Primary or gastric causes of vomiting are those that are due to diseases of the stomach and upper intestinal tract. Secondary or non-gastric causes of vomiting are caused by diseases of other organs that cause an accumulation of toxic substances in the blood. These toxic substances stimulate the vomiting center in the brain causing the animal to vomit. Read more...

Zoonotic Diseases
While most feline infectious diseases affect only cats, and most human infectious diseases affect only humans, it is important to be aware that some of these diseases-called zoonotic diseases-can be transmitted between cats and people. You are much more likely to contract ailments from other humans than you are from your cat. Read more...